The 17th CNS International Summer School (CNSSS18)

Asia/Tokyo
Nishina Hall

Nishina Hall

Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
Susumu Shimoura (CNS)
Description

The 17th CNS International Summer School will be held on Augst 22nd to 28th, 2018 at Nishina-hall of RIBF. The school is hosted by the CNS, University of Tokyo and supported by RIKEN Nishina Center and cooperated by ANPhA.

The school aims to foster the young generation of nuclear physicists, in particular Asian students/post-docs. The lectures of theoretical and experimental nuclear physics will be given by several world-leading lecturers. There will be also young scientist sessions where the participants will talk on their own research. CNSSS Young Scientist Awards will be given to several contributions. In addition, the ANPhA/AAPPS-DNP prize for young physicist will be awarded to the best presenter among them.

The lecturers of this years are,

  • Dr. Takashi Abe (CNS Univ. of Tokyo, JP, nuclear structure with ab-initio theory )

  • Prof. Yasuyuki Akiba (BNL/RIKEN,  JP, High energy heavy ion collision)

  • Prof. Peter Butler (Univ. of Liverpool, UK, Nuclear structure studies with RIB)

  • Prof. Masaaki Kimura (Hokkaido Univ., JP, Nuclear structure theory)

  • Dr. Alberto Mengoni (Bologna/INFN, IT, Theoretical and experimental nuclear astrophysics)

  • Prof. Toshimi Suda (Tohoku Univ., JP, Electron scattering from nucleon and nuclei)

  • Dr. Juzo Zenihiro (RIKEN, JP, overview of RIBF)

Further information will be updated here.

Registration fee below is asked to pay in cash at the on-site registration.

  • Senior scientists;  1,000 JY
  • Staff scientists;     4,000 JY
  • PD;                        3,000 JY
  • PhD students;       1,000 JY

 

 

 

    • 9:50 AM 10:00 AM
      Greetings 10m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      Speaker: Prof. Susumu Shimoura (CNS, Univ. of Tokyo)
    • 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
      Lectures: Lecture1 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 10:00 AM
        Nuclear Structure Studies with RIB 1 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Peter Butler (The University of Liverpool)
    • 10:50 AM 11:05 AM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 11:05 AM 11:55 AM
      Lectures: Lecture2 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 11:05 AM
        Quark-Gluon Plasma 1 50m
        Speaker: Dr Yasuyuki Akiba (RIKEN)
    • 11:55 AM 1:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 35m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 1:30 PM 2:20 PM
      Lectures: Lecture3 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 1:30 PM
        TBA (nuclear structure ab-initio theory) 50m
        Speaker: Dr Takashi Abe (CNS)
    • 2:20 PM 2:35 PM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 2:35 PM 3:25 PM
      Lectures: Lecture4 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 2:35 PM
        Experimental and Theoretical Nuclear Astrophysics 1 50m
        Speaker: Dr Alberto Mengoni (Bologna/INFN )
    • 3:25 PM 3:40 PM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 3:40 PM 5:45 PM
      YSS: Young Scientists Session 1 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 3:40 PM
        Isovector and isotensor forces in sd-shell 15m

        Isochronous mass spectrometry has been applied in the storage ring CSRe to measure the masses of the $T_z=-3/2$ nuclei $^{27}$P and $^{29}$S in $sd$-shell. The new mass excess value is 66(52)~keV larger than the result of the previous $^{32}$S($^3$He,$^{6}$He)$^{29}$S reaction measurement in 1973 and a factor of 3.8 more precise. The new result for $^{29}$S, together with those of the $T=3/2$ isobaric analog states (IAS) in $^{29}$P, $^{29}$Si, and $^{29}$Al, fit well into the quadratic form of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation IMME. The mass excess of $^{27}$P has also been remeasured. By analyzing the linear and quadratic coefficients of the IMME in the $T_z=-3/2$ $sd$-shell nuclei, it was found that the ratio of the Coulomb radius parameters is $R\approx0.96$ and is nearly the same for all $T=3/2$ isospin multiplets. Such a nearly constant $R$-value, apparently valid for the entire light mass region with $A>9$, can be used to set stringent constraints on the isovector and isotensor components of the isospin non-conserving forces in theoretical calculations.

        Speaker: Mr Chaoyi FU (Institute of modern physics)
      • 3:55 PM
        Production of n-rich nuclei via 2-proton knockout with deuterium target 15m

        Production of neutron-rich nuclei through one-nucleon knockout (p,2p) reactions has been successfully demonstrated with the MINOS at RIBF. In future RIBF experiments, a method to remove more than one protons with a reasonable rate will be required for production of more neutron-rich nuclei. At present there is no consensus on what the best reaction for two-proton removal is. In this presentation, a performance of the (d, 3pn) reaction with the MINOS as a candidate of the two-proton knockout driver in future RIBF experiments is discussed. The experiment was carried out using the SAMURAI spectrometer. A secondary cocktail beam including 58Ti was produced with projectile fragmentation reactions of a primary 70Zn beam at 345 MeV/u impinging on a beryllium target. The liquid hydrogen and deuterium with thicknesses of 1.1 g/cm2 and 1.8 g/cm2, respectively, were used as the secondary targets. The cross sections were derived by counting the numbers of particles before and after the target, considering an effective beam intensity. The secondary beam and fragments were identified event by event using the ∆E–TOF–Bρ method. It was found that cross section for two-proton removal with a deuteron target is larger by a factor of ~3 than that with a proton target. This fact may imply possible advantages of a deuteron target to produce neutron-rich nuclei via two-proton knockout.

        Speaker: Midori Miwa (Department of Physics, Saitama University)
      • 4:10 PM
        Proton resonance scattering of a shape-coexistence nucleus $^{118}$Sn 15m

        It is well known that shape coexistence was observed in stable even-even Sn(Z=50) nuclei, and the even-odd neighboring nucleus may have a hint of the structure. So far, some single-particle like states in Sn were observed by measuring (d,p) reaction on Sn. Though the isobaric analog resonances corresponding to the low-lying states in Sn were already measured for the spectroscopic information on Sn, there are some missing resonances expected from (d,p) reaction. It is necessary to measure the excitation function of proton-elastic resonance scattering with the wide energy range to understand the structure of $^{119}$Sn. The proton resonance elastic scattering on Sn yields the spectroscopic information of the single particle state coupled to the ground-state of Sn.
        The experiment was carried out at the tandem accelerator facility in Kyushu University. An enriched $^{118}$Sn target was irradiated by a proton beam while varying the beam energy from 7 to 10 MeV. The reaction channel was identified by the outgoing angle and energy of scattered protons measured by single-sided silicon strip detectors placed at 140-160°.

        Speaker: Ms Rieko Tsunoda (Center for Nuclear Study, the University of Tokyo)
      • 4:25 PM
        Proton Radius Measurements with electron scattering at ELPH 15m

        The proton radius has a serious problem in the today’s physics. The proton charge radius has been measured by electron scattering for more than fifty years and hydrogen spectroscopy. Since these results were consistent within experimental error, the proton radius has been believed to be $0.88$ fm. However, the radius extracted from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy reported in 2010 was about $5$% smaller than the value measured with electron. Despite intensive measurements and analyses, this discrepancy has not been explained reasonably yet, thus called “the proton radius puzzle”.

        We are going to obtain the proton radius, using elastic electron scattering with the highest accuracy at ELPH, Tohoku Univ. This experiment has two remarkable features. First, we will use low and variable energy electron beam accelerated by the $60$ MeV linac in ELPH. In electron scattering, the proton radius is deduced from the charge form factor, which is related to scattering cross sections, at the limit of the momentum transfer $Q^2→0$ . We will measure cross section in lowest-ever $Q^2$ and a wide range of the scattering angle, which enables to determine reliable distribution of charge form factor for the radius. Second, we will use polyethylene ($\rm CH_2$) as a target, because it is not an easy task to determine absolute cross sections. In our experiment, we will observe the scattered electron from proton (hydrogen) and carbon in the same time. The cross sections of electron-proton scattering can be determined relative to that of $\rm ^{12}C$, as it is well known.

        In this presentation, I will discuss the present status of the proton radius problems, and the detail of our experiment.

        Speaker: Taihei Aoyagi (ELPH, Tohoku University)
      • 4:40 PM
        Production of the Gamma-ray via narrow resonance reaction and its applications 15m

        High energy $\gamma$-ray can be used for nuclear waste transmutation, because of the giant resonance. The generation of high energy $\gamma$-ray mainly include bremsstrahlung, laser Compton scatter and resonance reaction. The thick target yield of the $9.17 MeV$ $\gamma$-ray from the resonance at $1.75 MeV$ in the $^{13}C(p,\gamma)^{14}N$ was measured by use of HPGe detector. The absolutely efficiency of the detector was calibrated by the GEANT4 simulation and the known radioactive activities of $^{56}Co$ and $^{152}Eu$. The energy and angular distribution of the $9.17 MeV$ $\gamma$-ray are determined. Meanwhile, the photo neutron cross section at the energy of $9.17 MeV$ for $^{197}Au(\gamma,n)$ has been determined.

        Speaker: Dr YONGLE DANG (China Institute of Atomic Energy, CIAE)
      • 4:55 PM
        Measurement of the Two-Halo Neutron Transfer Reaction 11Li(p,t)9Li at 62.4 MeV 15m

        We report the measurement of differential cross section of the 11Li(p,t)9Li reaction performed at TRIUMF. Previous investigation of the reaction was reported at lower energy of 3A MeV [1]. Present data were taken at higher energy where the direct reaction mechanism is expected to be more dominant. It will be shown that the present measurement shows the transition to a higher excited state than the previous report.
        We used the ISAC-II facility to accelerate 11Li to 62.4 MeV and the IRIS facility was used for measuring the 11Li(p,t) reaction. This experimental data were simultaneously taken with the published experiment of (p,p')[2].
        The transition to the second excited state of 9Li was observed for the first time. The presentation will describe the experiment and analysis.
        [1] I. Tanihata et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 192502 (2008).
        [2] J. Tanaka et al., Phys. Lett B 774, 268 (2017)

        Speaker: Mr Xuan Wang (RCNP Osaka Univ)
    • 6:00 PM 8:00 PM
      Welcome reception 2nd cafeteria

      2nd cafeteria

    • 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
      Lectures: Lecture5 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 10:00 AM
        Quark-Gluon Plasma 2 50m
        Speaker: Dr Yasuyuki Akiba (RIKEN)
    • 10:50 AM 11:05 AM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 11:05 AM 11:55 AM
      Lectures: Lecture6 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 11:05 AM
        Nuclear Structure Studies with RIB 2 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Peter Butler (The University of Liverpool)
    • 11:55 AM 1:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 35m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 1:30 PM 2:20 PM
      Lectures: Lecture7 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 1:30 PM
        Experimental and Theoretical Nuclear Astrophysics 2 50m
        Speaker: Dr Alberto Mengoni (Bologna/INFN )
    • 2:20 PM 2:35 PM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 2:35 PM 3:25 PM
      Lectures: Lecture8 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 2:35 PM
        TBA (nuclear structure theory) 1 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Masaaki Kimura (Hokkaido Univ.)
    • 3:25 PM 3:40 PM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 3:40 PM 5:30 PM
      YSS: Young Scientists Session 2 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 3:40 PM
        Systematic treatment of odd-mass nuclei in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation 15m

        Odd-mass nuclei are different from even-even nuclei in having finite spins in the ground state and breaking time-reversal symmetry. These differences make odd-mass nuclei more interesting and at the same time more difficult to study. Conventionally, an odd-particle system in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory or density functional theory is treated as a one-quasiparticle excited state on the neighbor even-particle vacuum. The inequal treatment between odd and even particle systems prevents the systematic study of odd-mass nuclei. I present the method of treating odd and even particle systems uniformly in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation, showing calculation results.

        Speaker: Mr Haruki Kasuya (Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University)
      • 3:55 PM
        Coulomb Energy Density Functionals for Nuclear Systems 15m

        Atomic nuclei are self-bound quantum many-body systems that consist of protons and neutrons, and protons and neutrons interact with each other by the nuclear and electromagnetic forces. In nuclear physics, the study of the nuclear force is still one of the most important topics, since the exact form of the nuclear force is still unknown [1]. It is known that nuclear force has almost the isospin symmetry, i.e., the nuclear force between protons and that between neutrons are almost the same [2] and the study of isospin symmetry breaking of the nuclear force is important to understand the nuclear force itself [3]. Although the contribution of the nuclear force for the binding energy is much larger than that of the electromagnetic force, in order to understand isospin symmetry breaking of the nuclear force, it is important to study the electromagnetic contribution, for example for the mirror nuclei mass difference [4] and the isospin symmetry-breaking correction to superallowed $\beta$ decay [5, 6], which are caused only by the electromagnetic force if the nuclear force has full isospin symmetry.

        The density functional theory (DFT) in principle gives the exact ground-state energy as a functional of the charge density [7, 8]. The accuracy of DFT depends only on the accuracy of the energy density functional (EDF). High-accuracy non-empirical EDFs for electron systems have been proposed for decades, although a systematic way of deriving the exact EDF is still an open problem [9, 10]. The ground-state energy of atomic nuclei in DFT is $ E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{gs}}} = T_0 \left[ \rho_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{gs}}} \right] + E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{Ch}}} \left[ \rho_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{gs}}} \right] + E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{Cx}}} \left[ \rho_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{gs}}} \right] + E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{nucl}}} \left[\rho_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{gs}}} \right] $, where $ T_0 $ is the kinetic energy of the non-interacting reference system and $ E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{ch}}} $, $ E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{Cx}}} $, and $ E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{nucl}}} $ are the Coulomb Hartree, Coulomb exchange, and nuclear terms, respectively [11]. It in principle allows high-accuracy evaluation of such electromagnetic contributions. However, so far the widely used scheme is the Hartree-Fock-Slater or Hartree approximations in nuclear physics [12].

        Recently, we examined whether the exchange and correlation EDFs developed for the electron systems is applicable to atomic nuclei [13]. Both the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals were investigated. We employed the experimental charge-density distributions $ \rho_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{ch}}} $ [14] of the selected nuclei as inputs of ground-state density distributions. For the exchange Coulomb energies, it is found that the deviation between the LDA and GGA, $ \Delta E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{x}}} = \left( E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{x}}}^{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{GGA}}} - E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{x}}}^{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{LDA}}} \right)/ E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{x}}}^{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{GGA}}} $ ranges from around $ 11 \, \% $ in $ {}^{4} \mathrm{He} $ to around $ 2.2 \, \% $ in $ {}^{208} \mathrm{Pb} $, with the GGA-PBE functional [15] for example. From light to heavy nuclei, it is seen that $ \Delta E_{\mathrm{\scriptstyle{x}}} $ behaves in a very similar way as the deviation between the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation and the exact Hartree-Fock calculation given by Le Bloas et al. [16]. In this sense, the GGA exchange functionals of electron systems can be applied in a straightforward manner with practical accuracy to atomic nuclei. In contrast, the correlation Coulomb energy density functionals of electron systems are not applicable for atomic nuclei, because correlation effects caused from the Coulomb force and from the nuclear force are not separable and the nuclear interaction determines the properties of atomic nuclei. The self-consistent calculation of the Kohn-Sham equation with the PBE exchange energy density functional was also tested [17]. In most cases, once one of the PBE-functional coefficient $ \mu $ is changed to $ 1.25 \mu $, the PBE exchange functional successfully reproduces the exact-Fock Coulomb energy. This fact is remarkable since the numerical cost of GGA is $ O \left( N^3 \right) $, whereas that cost of exact Hartree-Fock approximation is $ O \left( N^4 \right) $ for the self-consistent calculations.

        References
        [1] N. Ishii, S. Aoki, and T. Hatsuda. Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 022001 (2007).
        [2] E. Wigner. Phys. Rev. 51, 106 (1937).
        [3] X. Roca-Maza, G. Colò, and H. Sagawa. Phys. Rev. Lett. 120, 202501 (2018).
        [4] J. A. Nolen, Jr. and J. P. Schiffer. Annu. Rev. Nucl. Sci. 19, 471 (1969).
        [5] H. Liang, N. Van Giai, and J. Meng. Phys. Rev. C 79, 064316 (2009).
        [6] J. C. Hardy and I. S. Towner. Phys. Rev. C 91, 025501 (2015).
        [7] P. Hohenberg and W. Kohn. Phys. Rev. 136, B864 (1964).
        [8] W. Kohn and L. J. Sham. Phys. Rev. 140, A1133 (1965).
        [9] J. P. Perdew and K. Schmidt. AIP Conf. Proc. 577, 1 (2001).
        [10] H. Liang, Y. Niu, and T. Hatsuda. Phys. Lett. B 779, 436 (2018).
        [11] T. Nakatsukasa, K. Matsuyanagi, M. Matsuo, and K. Yabana. Rev. Mod. Phys. 88, 045004 (2016).
        [12] M. Bender, P.-H. Heenen, and P.-G. Reinhard. Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 121 (2003).
        [13] T. Naito, R. Akashi, and H. Liang. Phys. Rev. C 97, 044319 (2018).
        [14] H. De Vries, C. W. De Jager, and C. De Vries. At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 36, 495 (1987).
        [15] J. P. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996).
        [16] J. Le Bloas, M.-H. Koh, P. Quentin, L. Bonneau, and J. I. A. Ithnin. Phys. Rev. C 84, 014310 (2011).
        [17] T. Naito, X. Roca-Maza, G. Colò, and H. Liang. In Progress.

        Speaker: Mr Tomoya Naito (Department of Physics, the University of Tokyo/RIKEN Nishina Center)
      • 4:10 PM
        The properties of nuclear matter under the Bethe-Brueckner-Goldstone Expansion 15m

        The accurate computation of the properties of bulk nuclear matter is a long-lasting theoretical problem in nuclear physics. The basic difficulties stem from the strong short-range repulsion between nucleons.This renders a straightforward perturbative calculation impossible. In the last few decades, different many-body perturbation theories have been devised to affront this problem. We mainly employ Bethe-Brueckner-Goldstone (BBG) theory. Recently, we investigate the properties of both symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) and pure neutron matter (PNM) under BBG expansion up to the third order. Various representative nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions are used, such as AV18 and CDBONN as well as the recent popular chiral potentials like N3LO and N4LO. The convergence of BBG expansion are well proved with high-precision modern NN interactions. However, for SNM, no satisfactory saturation points are obtained which means strong three-body forces (TBF) are required for all considered cases.

        Speaker: Dr Jia-Jing Lu (Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University)
      • 4:25 PM
        Neutrino self-interaction and MSW effect on the neutrino-process in core-collapse supernovae 15m

        We investigate the nuclear abundances uniquely produced from the neutrino-process in supernova (SN) explosion. We calculate the neutrino flux propagation and its modification by neutrino self-interactions near the neutrino-sphere along with the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) mixing in the outer envelopes. We compute the neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis of $^{7}$Li, $^{11}$B, $^{92}$Nb, $^{98}$Tc, $^{138}$La, and $^{180}$Ta. Near to the neutrino-sphere, the neutrino density is $\sim 10^{32} {\rm cm}^{-3}$. This number density is sufficiently large that the neutrino self-interaction becomes important. The interaction effect on the neutrino flux is calculated by solving the evolution equation for the neutrino density matrix with a collision term estimated in the mean field approximation. We discuss how the neutrino self-interaction and the MSW effect influence the nuclear production by using the modified neutrino spectra along with neutrino-nucleus interactions calculated in the Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA). Our results show that abundances of all nuclides considered in this work are increased by the neutrino self-interaction.

        Speaker: Ms Heamin Ko (Soongsil University)
      • 4:40 PM
        How to Improve Functionals in Density Functional Theory? 15m

        The density functional theory (DFT) is one of the most successful approaches to calculate the ground-state properties of atoms, molecules, and solids [1, 2]. The DFT is also applicable to nuclear systems [3, 4]. In principle, the DFT gives the exact ground-state density $\rho_{0}$ and energy $E_{0} =T_{0} \left[ \rho_{0} \right] + \int v_{{\rm ext}} \left( \mathbf{r} \right) \, \rho_{0} \left( \mathbf{r} \right) \, {\mathrm d} \mathbf{r} + E_{{\rm H}} \left[ \rho_{0} \right] + E_{{\rm xc}} \left[ \rho_{0} \right]$, where $T_{0}$ is the kinetic energy, $v_{{\rm ext}}$ is the external field, and $E_{{\rm H}} \left[ \rho_{0} \right]$ and $E_{{\rm xc}} \left[ \rho \right]$ is the Hartree and exchange-correlation energy density functional (EDF), respectively. However, in practice, $E_{{\rm xc}} \left[ \rho \right]$ is unknown, and thus the accuracy of the DFT calculation depends on the accuracy of the exchange-correlation EDF. Improvement of EDFs is one of the important topics both in electron systems and in nuclear systems.

        As one way to tackle the improvement of EDFs, the inverse approach of the DFT, so-called the inverse Kohn-Sham method (IKS), was proposed [5]. In the IKS, the Kohn-Sham potential, $v_{{\rm xc}}\left(\mathbf{r} \right)=\delta E_{{\rm xc}} \left[\rho \right] /\delta \rho \left(\mathbf{r}\right)$, is calculated from the input ground-state density $\rho_{0}\left(\mathbf{r}\right)$. The information obtained from the IKS, for example, the single-particle energies $\varepsilon_{i}$, is helpful for checking the accuracy of EDFs [6]. However, the way to improve EDFs directly has not been proposed yet.

        We proposed the way to improve EDFs based on the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) [7] and the IKS [8]. Improvement of EDFs is performed under the assumption for $E^{(1)}_{{\rm xc}}\left[\rho\right]$, which is added to conventional EDFs. As a benchmark, we check the reproducibility of the exchange [9] and correlation functionals [10] in the local density approximation (LDA). The assumed form of $E^{(1)}_{{\rm xc}}\left[\rho\right]$ is $A\int \rho^{\alpha}\left(\mathbf{r} \right)\,{\mathrm d}\mathbf{r}$, and input ground-state densities are pair of two ground-state density of noble gases. For the LDA exchange functional, it is found that $A$ and $\alpha$ are obtained within $7.2\, \%$ and $1.0\, \%$ from the pair of He and Ne, and within $2.3\, \%$ and $0.1\, \%$ from the pair of Xe and Rn. Although the LDA correlation functional is not a power functional of $\rho$, it is found that it is reproduced reasonably well especially in the low-density region from the pair of He and Ne, and in the high-density region from the pair of Xe and Rn.

        References
        [1] P. Hohenberg and W. Kohn. Phys. Rev. 136, B864 (1964).
        [2] W. Kohn and L. J. Sham. Phys. Rev. 140, A1133 (1965).
        [3] D. Vautherin and D. M. Brink. Phys. Rev. C 5, 626 (1972).
        [4] M. Bender, P. H. Heene, and P. G. Reinhard. Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 121 (2003).
        [5] Y. Wang and R. G. Parr. Phys. Rev. A 47, R1591 (1993).
        [6] C. J. Umrigar and X. Gonze. Phys. Rev. A 50, 3827 (1994).
        [7] S. Baroni, P. Giannozzi, and A. Testa. Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1861 (1987).
        [8] D. Ohashi, T. Naito, and H. Liang. In Progress.
        [9] P. A. M. Dirac. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 26, 376 (1930).
        [10] J. P. Perdew and A. Zunger. Phys. Rev. B 23, 5048 (1981).

        Speaker: Daisuke Ohashi (The University of Tokyo)
      • 4:55 PM
        A Study of Ground-state Energies with the Strutinsky's Method and Total Binding Energy in the Woods-Saxon Potential 15m

        A single particle states and energies simply are calculated by the Woods-Saxon potential. It corresponds with the concept of one-body potential and is a typical calculation of microscopic understanding the nuclear structure. However, this concept is not enough to make a relation between single particle energy and total binding energy. We, therefore, introduced the Strutinsky's method, as a shell correction method, for our calculation. It could be possible to understand total binding energy from microscopic calculation. And then, we will discuss applying a shell correction to calculation of total binding energy and deformation for light nuclei by using a one-body potential.

        Speaker: Seonghyun Kim (Soongsil University)
      • 5:10 PM
        Quantitative analysis of tensor effects in the relativistic Hartree-Fock theory* 15m

        Tensor force is one of the important components of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. With the advance of radioactive-ion-beam facilities around the world, much progress has been made in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei, and the critical role of the tensor force in the shell evolution of the exotic nuclei has been of great interest in the new century.
        The nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only approach that can cover almost the whole nuclear chart. In the framework of non-relativistic DFT, the tensor force is isolated from other components and its effects can be identified clearly. However, in the case of relativistic DFT, it is naturally contained through the Fock terms and mixed together with other components. Thus, a quantitative analysis of tensor effects in the relativistic DFT, i.e., relativistic Hartree-Fock (RHF) theory and fair and direct comparison with the results from non-relativistic DFT has been missing for long.
        In this work, we have identified the tensor force up to the $1/M^2$ order in each meson-nucleon coupling in the RHF theory, by the non-relativistic reduction for the relativistic two-body interactions. With the present formalism, for the first time, we achieved a fair comparison between the tensor effects in relativistic and non-relativistic DFT. Through the investigation of the isotopes and isotones $Z, N = 8, 20,$ and $28$, we found that the total tensor effects in the RHF effective interaction PKA1 is weaker than those in the Skyrme SLy5wT and Gogny GT2 effective interactions. This work is supposed to promote the developments of the relativistic DFT.

        *Zhiheng Wang, Qiang Zhao, Haozhao Liang, Wen Hui Long, arXiv:1806.11270

        Speaker: Mr Zhiheng Wang (Lanzhou University and University of Tsukuba)
    • 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
      Lectures: Lecture9 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 10:00 AM
        TBA (nuclear structure theory) 2 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Masaaki Kimura (Hokkaido Univ.)
    • 10:50 AM 11:05 AM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 11:05 AM 11:55 AM
      Lectures: Lecture10 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 11:05 AM
        TBA (nuclear structure theory) 3 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Masaaki Kimura (Hokkaido Univ.)
    • 11:55 AM 1:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 35m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 1:30 PM 2:20 PM
      Lectures: Lecture11 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 1:30 PM
        Electron scattering from nucleon and nuclei 1 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Toshimi Suda (Tohoku University)
    • 2:20 PM 2:35 PM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 2:35 PM 3:25 PM
      Lectures: Lecture12 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 2:35 PM
        Electron scattering from nucleon and nuclei 2 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Toshimi Suda (Tohoku University)
    • 3:25 PM 3:40 PM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 3:40 PM 5:30 PM
      YSS: Young Scientists Session 3 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 3:40 PM
        Mean-field study of the radiative capture 12C(p,γ)13N and 13C(p,γ)14N reactions 15m

        In this framework we study the effect of local optical potential on the radiative capture 12C(p,γ)13N and 13C(p,γ)14N reactions. The optical potential of nucleon-nucleus interaction is constructed by parameterization of Woods-Saxon potential and folding model using the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction CDM3Yn based on an extended Hartree-Fock calculation. The result indicates that the both potentials described effectively the (p,γ) reactions compared to the experimental data.

        Speaker: Mr Le-Anh Nguyen (Ho Chi Minh City University of Education)
      • 3:55 PM
        Study on Colossal Dielectric Constant Mechanism of Al/Nb Co-doped CCTO by PAT 15m

        Calcium copper titanate ceramics colossal dielectric constant mechanism is studied by changing its microstructure through co-doping different concentrations of Al/Nb on its Ti4+ sites (CaCu3Ti4-x Al0.5xNb0.5x O12,x=0.2%, 0.5%, 5%). We mainly use positron annihilation technique(PAT), combined with scanning electron microcopy(SEM) and complex impedance spectroscopy(IS), to explore the influence of microstructure on samples dielectric properties. SEM results show that the grain boundary of each sample has a pulpy appearance, and it is hardly for SEM to determine its thickness. However PAT is sensitive to the vacancy type defects trapped by grain boundaries, and can be used to characterize samples grain boundaries microstructure. The variation of coincident Doppler broadening spectra S parameters of samples with different co-doping concentration is consistent with the changing trend of their annihilation mean lifetimes, and the x=0.5% co-doped sample has the smallest S and mean lifetime which implies the thinnest thickness of grain boundary[1]. So the sample with x=0.5% has the highest dielectric constant according to the internal barrier layer capacitance ( IBLC) model[2]. Experiment results support the prediction of IBLC model, which describe the colossal dielectric constant mechanism of calcium copper titanate ceramics.

        Speaker: Ali Wen
      • 4:10 PM
        Development of GEM based BPM for Muon g-2/EDM experiment 15m

        The experimental value of muon g-2 factor is different with theoretical value that calculated from standard model. Therefore, measuring the g-2 factor has been considered as the key for beyond standard model. Muon g-2/EDM E34 experiment in J-PARC is one of the experimental effort to measure the magnetic moment of muon more precisely. Since the muon beam is used for this experiment, it is important to profile the properties of the beam. MCP BPM and CsI BPM is used for this work now, but using Gas electron multiplier(GEM) based BPM can be more economical way than using these BPMs. The development is ongoing, and the final goal of this work is to provide cost-effective method for profile the muon beam.

        Speaker: Yonghyun Son (Seoul National University)
      • 4:25 PM
        Initial geometry effect on HBT correlation in C+Au collisions in AMPT model 15m

        In high-energy nuclear physics, the property of quark gluon plasma is a key target. In traditional nuclear physics, the structure of light nuclei is always an important field. In recent years, it has been proposed that relativistic heavy-ion collision also offers a possibility of studying low-energy nuclear structure phenomena. Through $^{12}$C+$^{197}$Au collisions from the AMPT model, the azimuthal angle dependence of correlation lengths (the Hanbury Brown-Twiss radii) is calculated. Three configurations of $^{12}$C are considered, which are $\alpha$-clustered triangle, $\alpha$-clustered chain and Woods-Saxon distribution of nucleons. The evolution of the angular distribution of the HBT radii from pion-pion correlation and phi-phi correlation is discussed. From our study, one can learn that the HBT correlation from identical particles at freeze-out is able to distinguish the different initial configurations and hadronic rescattering time plays an important role in the evolution.

        Speaker: Mr Junjie He (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)
      • 4:40 PM
        Two-particle angular correlations in pp and p-Pb collisions at LHC energies from a multi-phase transport mode 15m

        We apply a multi-phase transport (AMPT) model to study two-particle angular correlations in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV. Besides being able to describe the angular correlation functions of meson-meson pairs, a large improvement for the angular correlations of baryon-baryon and antibaryon-antibaryon is achieved. We further find that the AMPT model with new quark coalescence provides an even better description on the anti-correlation feature of baryon-baryon correlations observed in the experiments. We also extend the study to p-Pb collisions at √s = 5.02 TeV and obtained similar results. These results help us better understand the particle production mechanism in pp and p-Pb collisions at LHC energies.

        Speaker: Mr Liuyao Zhang (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)
      • 4:55 PM
        Characterization of a tritium target for two-neutron transfer studies at TRIUMF 15m

        (t,p) two-neutron transfer reactions are well suited for studying pairing correlations and shape coexistence phenomena. At radioactive beam facilities, (t,p) reactions have to be performed in inverse kinematics requiring a tritium target.

        At TRIUMF a tritium-loaded titanium target has recently become available. For the analysis and planning of future experiments, it is desirable to characterize the target through elastic scattering measurements using an accelerated beam. We performed the measurements at the ISAC-II facility, TRIUMF. The results for the tritium thickness and the degree of hydrogen contamination will be shown in this talk.

        Speaker: Noritaka Kitamura
    • 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
      Lectures: Lecture13 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 10:00 AM
        Experimental and Theoretical Nuclear Astrophysics 3 50m
        Speaker: Dr Alberto Mengoni (Bologna/INFN )
    • 10:50 AM 11:05 AM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 11:05 AM 11:55 AM
      Lectures: Lecture14 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 11:05 AM
        Electron scattering from nucleon and nuclei 3 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Toshimi Suda (Tohoku University)
    • 11:55 AM 1:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 35m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 1:30 PM 2:20 PM
      Lectures: Lecture15 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 1:30 PM
        Electron scattering from nucleon and nuclei 4 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Toshimi Suda (Tohoku University)
    • 2:20 PM 2:35 PM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 2:35 PM 3:25 PM
      Lectures: Lecture16 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 2:35 PM
        Quark-Gluon Plasma 3 50m
        Speaker: Dr Yasuyuki Akiba (RIKEN)
    • 3:25 PM 6:25 PM
      YSS: Poster Session Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 3:25 PM
        The study of resonant states in $^{12}$C via $^{12}$C + nucleon scattering 10m

        In carbon isotopes, the cluster structure is developed and some excited resonant states regarded as gaslike state of α particles appears. For example, the resonant state called the Hoyle state in $^{12}$C is important in the process of the nucleosynthesis. It is very important to study the excited states in $^{12}$C including the Hoyle state, especially resonant states. In the previous works, there are many experiments to probe those states. However, not only resonant states, but also non-resonant states are included in the data from the experiments, so we need to get only information of resonant states.

        In our study, we analyze $^{12}$C + nucleon scattering to understand the effects of the resonant and non- resonant states in $^{12}$C. We adapt the complex scaling method (CSM) for the description of the resonant states, and calculate the cross sections with the four-body CDCC method. In the CDCC calculation, we use the JLM potential, which is the optical-model potential and we consider the $0^+,1^-,\ \text{and}\ 2^+$ states of $^{12}$C.

        In this conference, we report the results of the breakup cross sections, and discuss the effects of the resonant and non-resonant states in $^{12}$C.

        Speaker: Yushin Yamada (Kyushu University)
      • 3:35 PM
        Microscopic optical potentials including the breakup effects for unstable nucleus scattering 10m

        Recently, study on unstable nuclei near the neutron dripline has been attracted by the development of radioactive ion-beam experiments. The optical potential between a projectile and a target is a basic ingredient to describe the elastic scattering. In the neutron-rich region, it is difficult to determine the phenomenological optical potential due to restrictions on experimental data. Therefore, we need to construct the optical potential microscopically.

        The g-matrix folding model has been widely used as a reliable method to obtain the microscopic optical potential. However, this approach does not work well for the case of unstable nuclei, since the folding model neglects projectile-excitation effects that are important for reactions involving weakly-binding nuclei.

        In our study, we propose a method to construct a microscopic optical potential including projectile-excitation effects by combining the folding model with the Glauber model. In this conference, we will report the results applied to $^{3,6}$He scattering, and discuss applicability to the case of the proton target.

        Speaker: Mr Shoya Ogawa (Kyushu University)
      • 3:45 PM
        Study of proton- and deuteron- induced reactions on the long-lived fission product 93Zr at 30MeV/u in inverse kinematics 10m

        [background]
        Nuclear reactions for the long-lived fission product (LLFP) $\mathrm{^{93}Zr}$($\mathrm{T_{1/2}}$=1.6million years) have been studied for the purpose of nuclear waste transmutation. According to the previous report[1], it was found that the proton- and deuteron-induced spallation reactions at 105 MeV/u are effective for the $\mathrm{^{93}Zr}$ transmutation. For systematic study, we performed an experiment for the proton- and deuteron- induced reactions on $\mathrm{^{93}Zr}$ at 30 MeV/u. In this energy region, the fusion evaporation process is dominant. Thus, the reaction mechanism dependence can be studied by comparison with the high energy spallation data.

        [experimental method]
        This experiment was performed at RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF). The degraded RI beams at 30 MeV/u were produced by a newly developed beam line, OEDO. To induce the reactions, the high-pressure cooled gas targets ($\mathrm{H_2}$ and $\mathrm{D_2}$ ) were used. Reaction residues were analyzed by the SHARAQ spectrometer.

        In this talk, we will present the details of experiments and the obtained results.

        References
        [1] S. Kawase et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2017 , 093D03 (2017).

        Speaker: Kotaro Iribe (Department of Physics , Kyushu University)
      • 3:55 PM
        Development of Fast Neutron Detection Based on Multi-size Fiber Array 10m

        Fast neutron detection using recoil proton track detector based on organic fiber array is widely used to detect single neutron event. To broaden its energy detection range, a multi-size fiber array structure is designed and evaluated under Monte-Carlo simulation in our work. A test detector is also developed, archieving a energy resolution of 43% at neutron energy of 14.1MeV generated by D-T neutron generator, and having a simulated energy response up to 100MeV. In order to reduce the detector volume, a compact structure of single-ended light output coupling directly with photomultiplier tube is then designed, tested and in continuous improvement.

        Speaker: Kai Zhuang (Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)
      • 4:05 PM
        18F(p,α)15O reaction in novae 10m

        The 511 keV gamma rays and below emitted by novae are mainly produced by 18F, the flux may be detected by satellite detectors. We can effectively constrain the novae model by comparing the theory and observation results. As the main consumed reaction of 18F, 18F(p,α)15O, its reaction rate is extremely important and has been invested for decades. This poster is mainly to introduce the gamma rays from novae and progress in studying the 18F(p,α)15O reaction rate at nova temperature.

        Speaker: Mr Longhui Ru
      • 4:15 PM
        Building the interstellar cloud model for describing the composition of chemical species 10m

        The molecular absorption spectra revealed the existence of molecular species in interstellar media(ISM). However, the reason for the existence is still unknown. To explain the existence of molecules, we make an interstellar cloud model which can describe the current chemical state of ISM. We have improved a previously suggested static cloud model, which fit only a few observational data, by increasing the number of molecular species.

        Speaker: Jeongkwan Yoon (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST))
      • 4:25 PM
        2nd-order superfluid Thomas-Fermi approximation and FAM-QRPA method for ultracold fermions 10m

        The superfluid many-body systems can be described by Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equation. However, the HFB calculations is not feasible when systems have a large number of particles or quasi-continuum spectrum. In this case, the superfluid Thomas-Fermi approximation is very useful. Furthermore, the second-order superfluid Thomas-Fermi approximation has been derived. We know the 2nd-order Thomas-Fermi method without pairing has been applied a long time ago. The 2nd-order superfluid Thomas-Fermi method is very complex and has been applied to only a few examples. Based on the Green’s function expansion method, we derived the 2nd-order superfluid Thomas-Fermi method with effective mass and spin-orbit potential so that it can be applied to general cases. The expressions have been examined in nuclei.
        The collective modes of many particle systems are usually described by linear response approximation or hydrodynamic method. For cold atomic systems, there are strong experimental interests for measurements of multipole collective modes, which are related to equation of state and superfluidity. We have developed the FAM-QRPA code for describing collective modes of deformed nuclei and general superfluid systems. Compared with the conventional QRPA method, the FAM-QRPA is more efficient and can be applied to large deformed systems. In this cases, the detailed discrepancy between QRPA and hydrodynamic method for cold atomic systems in a trap have been studied to explore the finite-size effects.

        Speaker: Ms Na Fei (Peking University)
      • 4:35 PM
        GAMMA STRENGTH FUNCTION OF 49Ti BASE ON (n, 2) REACTION 10m

        Gamma strength function is importance information to study nuclear structure by experiment. The experiment data is corrected the nuclear structure models. Nowadays, the comparison between experiment and theory of gamma strength function is significant two to four order differences. This report presents some results of experimental of gamma strength function which is based on 48Ti(n,2)49Ti reaction.

        Speaker: Mr Son Nguyen An (Dalat University)
      • 4:45 PM
        Research on SiPM-based detector for gamma ray detection 10m

        Nuclear medicine is an important application of nuclear physics in the field of medicine. As the primary means of nuclear medicine, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Gamma Camera are the most effective methods for early diagnosis of tumors by detecting and imaging the gamma rays produced by radioactive tracers. In this work, the characteristics of pixel silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and the spatial resolution, energy resolution and time resolution of SiPM-based detector module were studied. On this basis, a large area double-plane detector were designed for early diagnosis of breast tumors with both PET and gamma camera imaging capability. The detector consists of pixelated LYSO scintillators and SiPM arrays with an effective detection area of 168.6×202.4 mm2, which could achieve the image of a single breast rapidly. Self-designed front-end electronics are used to simplify the readout circuit and retain good detector performances. Test results show that the detector have a good spatial resolution superior to 2mm, a 1.32ns coincidence time resolution and energy resolutions of 11.39%@511keV and 20.37%@141keV respectively. It suggests that the detector is promising to be applied in the dual modality system. In addition, the optimal performance of SiPM arrays under the discrete readout circuits is further studied by using application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) to enhance resolutions of the detector. In this case, the optimal coincidence time resolution is up to 417ps and the average energy resolution is increased to 9.7% @511keV, 20.6% @ 122keV respectively.

        Speaker: Mr Zhenrui Lu (Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)
      • 4:55 PM
        Study of Gamow-Teller Transition on He-4 with PANDORA 10m

        Gamow-Teller(GT) transition is one of the basic excitation modes in nuclei. Though these kind of excitation modes are well studied on stable nuclei, data on exotic nuclei are still lacking. Due to the high isospin asymmetry [(N-Z)/A] of neutron dripline nuclei, the energy gain of GT resonance of these nuclei is expected to be enhanced. In addition, 6He is a halo nucleus, it’s neutron halo can be regarded as pure neutron matter. GT transition measurement on 6He may extend our knowledge on spin-isospin collectivity to very exotic nuclear matter.

        Inverse kinematics gives us chance to study unstable nuclei. Neutrons of 6He(p,n)6Li reaction were measured to reconstruct missing mass spectra. Because both photon and neutron have no charge, it’s hard to distinguish them for traditional detectors. The random gamma-ray background can be a big problem for neutron measurement. So a new detector system, PANDORA(Particle Analyzer Neutron Detector Of Real-time Acquisition), was developed to discriminate neutron events and reduce the gamma background.

        Performance of the neutron-gamma discrimination and some preliminary results of the experiments will be shown in the poster.

        Speaker: Jian GAO
      • 5:05 PM
        PRE(Photospheric radius expansion) X-ray burst simulation with 1D stellar evolution code 10m

        MESA(Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics) simulate stellar evolution to solve the equations including many physical processes such as nuclear reaction, equation of state, and opacity in 1-D. It can also simulate the X-ray burst using the profile of neutron star surface and the accretion information. But MESA does not deal with the PRE(Photospheric Raidus Expansion) phenomena because if its luminosity goes beyond the Eddington limit without special conditions, the simulation does not proceed due to time step problem. So here, we are looking for a way to solve this problem to simulate the PRE burst using MESA. Next, we will study the conditions that cause PRE.

        Speaker: GWANGEON SEONG (UNIST)
      • 5:15 PM
        Production of 52Fe 12+ isomer around Fe nucleus via projectile fragmentation 10m

        Electron capture rates of nuclei near iron in stars are important inputs for network calculation. In stars, nuclei may be excited due to the high temperature circumstances and then reactions on excited nuclei plays an important role in nucleosynthesis.
        One possible way to perform reaction study on excited state is to measure the reaction with an “isomer” beam in inverse kinematics.The 52Fe(12+) at Ex= 7 MeV is a good candidate around iron nuclei.
        We measured the isomer ratio of aiming to clarify the production mechanism of isomer via projectile fragmentation.
        Experiments were performed at HIMAC which has synclotoron and fragment separator. The isomer ratio of 52Fe and its neighboring nuclei are measured by using projectile fragmentation with beams of 58Ni,59Co and 82Kr at 350 MeV/u as functions of longitudinal momentum transfer as well as transverse momentum transfers. To obtain the transverse momentum dependence the incident beam angle to the target was changed with a beam swinger system.
        The results of on the isomer ratio around 52Fe nucleus will be presented.

        Speaker: Keita Kawata (Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo)
    • 10:00 AM 6:00 PM
      HOME WORKS... Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
      Lectures: Lecture17 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 10:00 AM
        Nuclear Structure Studies with RIB 3 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Peter Butler (The University of Liverpool)
    • 10:50 AM 11:05 AM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 11:05 AM 11:55 AM
      Lectures: Lecture18 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 11:05 AM
        Experimental and Theoretical Nuclear Astrophysics 4 50m
        Speaker: Dr Alberto Mengoni (Bologna/INFN )
    • 11:55 AM 1:30 PM
      Lunch 1h 35m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 1:30 PM 2:20 PM
      Lectures: Lecture19 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 1:30 PM
        Overview of RIBF 50m
        Speaker: Dr Juzo Zenihiro (RIKEN)
    • 2:20 PM 4:20 PM
      RIBF Tour Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 10:00 AM 10:50 AM
      Lectures: Lecture20 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 10:00 AM
        Quark-Gluon Plasma 4 50m
        Speaker: Dr Yasuyuki Akiba (RIKEN)
    • 10:50 AM 11:05 AM
      coffee break 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 11:05 AM 11:55 AM
      Lectures: Lecture21 Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
      • 11:05 AM
        Nuclear Structure Studies with RIB 4 50m
        Speaker: Prof. Peter Butler (The University of Liverpool)
    • 11:55 AM 12:10 PM
      CNSSS YSS Awards ceremony 15m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan
    • 12:10 PM 12:20 PM
      Closing of CNSSS18 10m Nishina Hall

      Nishina Hall

      Hirosawa 2-1, Wako 351-0198, Japan